The wine park

Countries

Australia

map-australia

australia_vineyards

McLaren-Vale

Henschke-Hill-of-Grace

Australia's first vineyards were planted in 1788 in a small area near the Sydney Harbour Bridge with varieties being introduced from Europe and South Africa. Today you will find vineyards throughout all 62 designated wine regions totalling 170,000 hectare; however these Australian wine regions are mainly in the southern, cooler parts of the country. Current export figures place Australia as the fourth largest exporter of wine, with only about 40% of production consumed domestically, selling to more than 100 countries around the world and contributing $5.5 billion to the nation's economy. The country has no native grapes; major varieties are Shiraz, Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Merlot, Semillon, Pinot Noir, Riesling and Sauvignon Blanc. Wines are often labelled with the name of their grape variety, which must constitute at least 85 percent of the wine.

Let’s take a look at some of Australia’s important wine regions as below :

Barossa Valley : The Barossa Valley is one of Australia's oldest wine regions. Located in South Australia, the Barossa Valley is about 56 km northeast of the city of Adelaide. Shiraz is the most important and popular grape here with some vineyards planted with old vines that are 100–150 years old. Other grape varieties include Grenache, Mourvedre, Cabernet Sauvignon, Riesling, Chardonnay and Semillon. Many of Australia's largest and most notable wineries are either headquartered or own extensive holdings in the Barossa Valley. These include such wineries as Penfolds, Peter Lehmann, Orlando Wines, Seppeltsfield, Wolf Blass and Yalumba.

McLaren Vale : McLaren Vale is a wine region approximately 35 km south of Adelaide in South Australia and is internationally renowned for the wines it produces. Grapes were first planted in the region in 1838 and some vines more than 100 years old are still producing. McLaren Vale has a Mediterranean climate with four clear seasons. Notable for producing Shiraz, the grape is by far the most important variety for the region, accounting for about 50% of the total crush. The area's thin soils, limited water, and warm summers harness Shiraz’s natural vigour and produce intense flavoured fruit, and wine with a deep purple colour that can last decades in the bottle. Other major varieties include Cabernet Sauvignon, Grenache and Sauvignon Blanc. The majority producers are small family-run operations and boutique wineries.

Coonawara : Coonawarra, located on the Limestone Coast of South Australia, is known for the Cabernet Sauvignon wines produced on its "terra rossa" soil. A type of red clay soil produced by the weathering of limestone, Coonawarra's terra rossa soil is one of the most famous terroirs in the New World, covering an area of just 30 square kms. Being just 60 km from the sea, Coonawarra has a somewhat maritime climate not dissimilar to Bordeaux. Coonawarra is synonymous with classy Cabernet Sauvignon, full of plum and blackcurrant fruit. So much so, that successes with other grape varieties is overlooked. In the early days Shiraz was the most widely-planted grape. The limestone geology also suits Chardonnay, Riesling, and Sauvignon Blanc.

Margaret River : The foremost Geographical Indication wine region in the South West Australia Zone with nearly 5,500 hectares under vine, Margaret River is made up predominately of boutique size wine producers consisting of over 138 wineries as of 2008. Similar to that of Bordeaux in a dry vintage, the climate is more strongly maritime-influenced than any other major Australian region. Although the region produces just three percent of total grape production, it produces over 20 percent of Australia's premium wine market. The principal grape varieties are fairly evenly split between red and white; Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Sémillon, Shiraz, Merlot, Chenin Blanc and Verdelho.

Mornington Peninsula : Located south of Melbourne, it is a cool climate region that focuses on Pinot Noir production but has had success with other varietals including Chardonnay, Pinot Gris and Tempranillo. The region is known for its medium bodied, dry wines and sparkling wines that show structure and complexity. The still wine versions of Chardonnay reflect a diversity of styles, all typically unoaked, from more citrus to more tropical fruit flavours.

Yarra Valley : Located east of Melbourne, it is a cool climate region that is best known for producing Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. Its proximity to the urban centre and high profile wineries has made it an important destination for wine tourism. Chardonnay in Australia, long associated with a deep, oily, buttery style has gone out of fashion nationwide. Yarra Valley leads the charge on leaner, acid-driven styles of Chardonnay, more closely aligned with Burgundy.

Hunter Valley : Located in the state of New South Wales, Hunter Valley is one of Australia's best known wine regions. It has played a pivotal role in the history of Australian wine as one of the first wine regions planted in the early 19th century. Hunter Valley Semillon is widely considered the iconic wine of the region but also produces wines from Shiraz, Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon and Verdelho grapes.

Eden Valley : A small South Australian town in the Barossa Ranges, it shares its western boundary with the Barossa Valley. The region is of similar size to the Barossa Valley, and is well known for producing high quality Riesling and Shiraz wines.

Clare Valley : One of Australia's oldest wine regions, Clare Valley lies in the Mid North of South Australia, approximately 120 km north of Adelaide. The most important white variety is Riesling, with the Clare Valley regarded as its Australian home. Principal red varieties are Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz. They make a range of styles of varietal wines, reflecting different approaches to winemaking as well as the influences of the various sub-regions and micro-climates in the valleys.

Heathcote Wine Region : Recognised as a producer of high-end Shiraz wines, even rivalling those of the Rhone Valley, it is home to some flagship winemakers who have achieved international fame for their representations of Australian Shiraz. Notable producers include Shadowfax Winery, Wild Duck Creek Estate, Jasper Hill and Paul Osicka Wines. Its wines are perceived as exclusive, in part because of the difficulty in obtaining them. This is changing with new plantings and new wineries coming on stream and more boutique Heathcote winemakers preparing to supply the domestic and global markets.

Adelaide Hills : Adjoining Eden Valley to the north and running into the northern tip of McLaren Vale in the south, it has over 50 wineries crammed in to the folds of the Hills. It grows Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay, Riesling Pinot Gris and Pinot Noir. Warmer vineyard sites can handle Shiraz and even Cabernet, and they result in wines with elegance, herbal lift and definition. With Chardonnay and Pinot Noir in the ground, it is no surprise that fizz is made up here, too.

Australia has almost 2000 wine producers, most of whom are small winery operations. Australia's most famous wine is Penfolds Grange. Other red wines to garner international attention include Henschke Hill of Grace, Clarendon Hills Astralis, D'Arenberg Dead Arm, Torbreck Run Rig and other high-end Penfolds wines such as St Henri Shiraz.

Our Wines :
  1. Rolf Binder, HALLIWELL, Shiraz-Grenache - 2009

    RP 90
    Australia
    Grenache, Shiraz
    Red Wine

    Out of stock

  2. Tapestry, Chardonnay - 2009

    Australia
    Chardonnay
    White Wine

    Out of stock

  3. Tapestry, Shiraz - 2009

    Australia
    Shiraz
    Red Wine

    Out of stock

  4. Tapestry, Cabernet Sauvignon - 2010

    Australia
    Cabernet Sauvignon
    Red Wine

    Out of stock

  5. Tapestry, Shiraz - 2010

    Australia
    Shiraz
    Red Wine

    Out of stock